{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 11, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/11", "Disp_Access_No" : "2015.2.6", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "2000", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "2000", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2000", "Disp_Title" : "Gilded Silver and Aquamarine Chandelier with Putti", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Dale Chihuly", "Sort_Artist" : "Chihuly, Dale", "Disp_Dimen" : "94 x 84 in. (238.8 x 213.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "94 in.", "Disp_Width" : "84 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "glass", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "glass", "Info_Page_Comm" : "<SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica'">Dale Chilhuly’s chandelier enhances the entranceway of Storer Hall, the music building at Kenyon College. Subtle aquamarine gradations throughout the ensemble of pale, curled glass strands create a dynamic and cohesive whole. The colors in the chandelier can be found elsewhere in Storer, tying the work closely to the space where it resides. Chihuly is known for large-scale glass works, as he combines traditional Venetian glassblowing techniques with contemporary aesthetics. His work helped launch the success of the postwar American studio glass movement and he is credited with establishing the Pacific Northwest as a destination for glass artists. In </SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica';font-style:italic">Gilded Silver and Aquamarine Chandelier with Putti, he </SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica'">carefully works with color and scale, balancing the depth of pigmentation with the physical spacing of sculptural elements.</SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Segoe UI'"><BR/><BR/></SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica';font-style:italic">Emma Garschagen `19</SPAN></SPAN>", "Dedication" : "Gund Gallery Collection; gift of Mr. and Mrs. Graham Gund ’63", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/Chihuly_SilverChandelier.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/Chihuly_SilverChandelier.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/Chihuly_SilverChandelier.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/Chihuly_SilverChandelier.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "71", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 17, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/17", "Disp_Access_No" : "2015.2.13", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1976", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1976", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1976", "Disp_Title" : "Bust of Victoria, Her 101st Year as Queen", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "David James Gilhooly", "Sort_Artist" : "Gilhooly, David James", "Disp_Dimen" : "27 x 19 x 17 in. (68.6 x 48.3 x 43.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "27 in.", "Disp_Width" : "19 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "glazed ceramic", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "glazed ceramic", "Info_Page_Comm" : "<SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica'">Adorned in pearls and a raggedy royal costume, David Gilhooly’s satirical depiction of Queen Victoria as an aging frog pokes fun at high culture with an absurd and comedic style. A part of Gilhooly’s series “Frog World,” Bust of Victoria is a sardonic commentary on aristocracy and ascendency in society. Expanded upon over the course of his career, the series, launched in the mid-1960’s, features a wide range of pop-culture personas existing in an alternative universe of ceramic frogs. Taken from this imaginary realm, the grotesque portrait bust is incongruous as an iconic figure of imperial power and underscores Gilhooly’s irreverent take on societal mores. </SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Segoe UI'"><BR/><BR/></SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica'">While assisting sculptor and ceramicist Robert Arneson at the TB9 studio at UC Davis, Gilhooly became a member of a circle of artists who established the Bay Area Funk Art movement. Spawned during the revolutionary sixties, the movement marks a dynamic artistic, political, and societal moment where rebellion against social norms and the establishment of new modes of expression took hold. The Funk Art movement influenced the development of contemporary American ceramics through its use of unconventional subject matter and embrace of an anti-establishment ethos.</SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Segoe UI'"><BR/><BR/></SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica';font-style:italic">Isabelle Brauer `16</SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Segoe UI'"><BR/></SPAN></SPAN>", "Dedication" : "Gund Gallery Collection; gift of Mr. and Mrs. Graham Gund ’63", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/Gilhooly_QueenVictoria.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/Gilhooly_QueenVictoria.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/Gilhooly_QueenVictoria.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/Gilhooly_QueenVictoria.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "73", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 18, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/18", "Disp_Access_No" : "2015.2.14", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "2002", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "2002", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2002", "Disp_Title" : "Pore", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Antony Gormley", "Sort_Artist" : "Gormley, Antony", "Disp_Dimen" : "28 1/2 x 35 7/8 x 24 1/2 in. (72.4 x 91.1 x 62.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "28 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "35 7/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "cast iron", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "cast iron", "Info_Page_Comm" : "<SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica'">British sculptor Antony Gormley utilizes the human form as the basis for his investigations navigating the subjectivity and indexicality of one’s physical presence in the world. Often using his own body as the basis for his work, he critically engages the tangible physical presence of one’s body in the world in which we live.</SPAN>", "Dedication" : "Gund Gallery Collection; gift of Mr. and Mrs. Graham Gund ’63", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/Gormley_Pore.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/Gormley_Pore.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/Gormley_Pore.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/Gormley_Pore.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "108", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 31, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/31", "Disp_Access_No" : "2015.2.27", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "2002", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "2002", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2002", "Disp_Title" : "Indian Hunter and Pronghorn Antelope", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Paul Manship", "Sort_Artist" : "Manship, Paul", "Disp_Dimen" : "76 x 50 x 40 in. (193 x 127 x 101.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "76 in.", "Disp_Width" : "50 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "bronze", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "bronze", "Info_Page_Comm" : "<SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica'">As an arrow sinks into the back of a hunter’s prey, </SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica';font-style:italic">Indian Hunter and Antelope</SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica'"> captures a dynamic, highly charged moment. Located on the East Terrace of Peirce Hall, Kenyon College’s dining hall, the location leads to questions about the ethics of hunting and fosters dialog concerning the complicated issue of food production and delivery. Paul Manship was a sculptor generally thought to be an influence upon and exponent of the American Art Deco movement. His clear, linear style was largely inspired by archaic Greek, Roman, and Indian art. Ancient influences are apparent in his Neoclassical works, such as the idealized form of</SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica';font-style:italic"> Prometheus</SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica'"> at Rockefeller Center in New York.</SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Segoe UI'"><BR/><BR/></SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica';font-style:italic">Emma Garschagen `19</SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Segoe UI'"><BR/></SPAN></SPAN>", "Dedication" : "Gund Gallery Collection; gift of Mr. and Mrs. Graham Gund ’63", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/Manship_IndianHunter.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/Manship_IndianHunter.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/Manship_IndianHunter.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/Manship_IndianHunter.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "76", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 35, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/35", "Disp_Access_No" : "2015.2.31", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "2000", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "2000", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2000", "Disp_Title" : "Five Angel Musicians (maquette)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Carl Milles", "Sort_Artist" : "Milles, Carl", "Disp_Dimen" : "55 x 33 x 33 in. (139.7 x 83.8 x 83.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "55 in.", "Disp_Width" : "33 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "bronze", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "bronze", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gund Gallery Collection; gift of Mr. and Mrs. Graham Gund ’63", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/Milles_AngelMaquette.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/Milles_AngelMaquette.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/Milles_AngelMaquette.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/Milles_AngelMaquette.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "77", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 36, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/36", "Disp_Access_No" : "2015.2.32", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "2001", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "2001", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2001", "Disp_Title" : "Five Angel Musicians (full size sculpture)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Carl Milles", "Sort_Artist" : "Milles, Carl", "Disp_Dimen" : "82 x 14 x 14 in. each (208.3 x 35.6 x 35.6 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "82 in.", "Disp_Width" : "14 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "bronze", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "bronze", "Info_Page_Comm" : "<SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica';font-style:italic">Five Angel Musicians</SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica'"> complement Storer Hall, trumpeting the home of music at Kenyon College from their pedestals on the lawn. Each unique character, drawn from images from classical legends, brandishes their own instrument against the backdrop of the sky. Carl Emil Milles was a sculptor best known for his large-scale fountains and aquatically themed work. His fountains are monumental, combining scale, water effects, and intriguing figures. Often, Milles took influence from Nordic imagery and classical legends.</SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Segoe UI'"><BR/><BR/></SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica';font-style:italic">Emma Garschagen `19</SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Segoe UI'"><BR/></SPAN></SPAN>", "Dedication" : "Gund Gallery Collection; gift of Mr. and Mrs. Graham Gund ’63", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/Milles_AngelSculpture.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/Milles_AngelSculpture.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/Milles_AngelSculpture.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/Milles_AngelSculpture.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "78", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 38, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/38", "Disp_Access_No" : "2015.2.34", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1974 (from the model of 1968-69)", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1974", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1974", "Disp_Title" : "Large Spindle Piece", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Henry Moore", "Sort_Artist" : "Moore, Henry", "Disp_Dimen" : "132 x 130 x 90 1/2 in. (335.3 x 330.2 x 229.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "132 in.", "Disp_Width" : "130 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "cast monumental bronze", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "cast monumental bronze", "Info_Page_Comm" : "<SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica'">Henry Spencer Moore’s </SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica';font-style:italic">Large Spindle Piece</SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica'"> is a cast-bronze biomorphic form, fragmented into flowing waves and points. In conceiving this work, Moore drew from multiple sources: the form is based on a flint pebble the artist found around his home in Hertfordshire, England, and its movement is inspired by a detail in Michelangelo’s painting of God’s hand reaching out to Adam’s finger on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. Moore was interested in developing three dimensions in his pieces in new ways, which led him to introduce negative space into this sculpture. As a result, this amorphous twisting form seems to undulate out of an absent center.</SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Segoe UI'"><BR/><BR/></SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica';font-style:italic">Isabelle Brauer `16</SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Segoe UI'"><BR/></SPAN></SPAN>", "Dedication" : "Gund Gallery Collection; gift of Mr. and Mrs. Graham Gund ’63", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/Moore_SpindlePiece.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/Moore_SpindlePiece.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/Moore_SpindlePiece.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/Moore_SpindlePiece.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "79", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 45, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/45", "Disp_Access_No" : "2015.2.41", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1951", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1951", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1951", "Disp_Title" : "Woman-Faced Wood Owl (A.R. 119)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Pablo Picasso", "Sort_Artist" : "Picasso, Pablo", "Disp_Dimen" : "11 1/2 x 9 x 6 in. (29.2 x 22.9 x 15.2 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "11 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "9 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "ceramic vase", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "ceramic vase", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gund Gallery Collection; gift of Mr. and Mrs. Graham Gund ’63", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/Picasso_WomanOwlVase.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/Picasso_WomanOwlVase.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/Picasso_WomanOwlVase.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/Picasso_WomanOwlVase.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "80", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 48, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/48", "Disp_Access_No" : "2015.2.44", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "2004", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "2004", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2004", "Disp_Title" : "Her", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Kiki Smith", "Sort_Artist" : "Smith, Kiki", "Disp_Dimen" : "70 x 36 x 18 in. (177.8 x 91.4 x 45.7 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "70 in.", "Disp_Width" : "36 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "patinated bronze", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "patinated bronze", "Info_Page_Comm" : "<SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica'">Notions of home, feminism, domesticity, storytelling, and animals are themes that run concurrently throughout Kiki Smith’s body of work. Growing up, she took an interest in three-dimensional form as she often helped her father, artist Tony Smith, by making cardboard models for his sculptures. In the early 2000s, Kiki Smith’s figurative work evolved to focus on themes of life and death; femininity and patriarchy, which she often explored through allegorical relationships between humans and animals. Inspired by mythology, folktales, and her Catholic upbringing, Smith imagined feminist narratives based on figures such as Little Red Riding Hood and St. Genevieve. These stories informed the iconography of sculptures such as </SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica';font-style:italic">Her</SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica'">, a female nude figure standing upright and holding a small deer in front of her. The woman’s hands gently support the animal; her head leans in close to its body as the deer arches backward to rest its neck on her shoulder. Unlike human-animal relationships in traditional folk tales, which often establish predator-prey hierarchies, Smith shows the woman and animal in an unlikely pose that seems to imply their symbiosis. This pose dismantles predator/prey tropes in art and literature, which can symbolize hierarchies among humans, with women represented as submissive to patriarchal authority.</SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Segoe UI'"><BR/><BR/></SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica';font-style:italic">Caroline Chang `18</SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Segoe UI'"><BR/></SPAN></SPAN>", "Dedication" : "Gund Gallery Collection; gift of Mr. and Mrs. Graham Gund ’63", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/Smith_Her.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/Smith_Her.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/Smith_Her.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/Smith_Her.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "81", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 57, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/57", "Disp_Access_No" : "2015.2.53", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1993", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1993", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1993", "Disp_Title" : "White-Tipped Blooming", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "James Surls", "Sort_Artist" : "Surls, James", "Disp_Dimen" : "57 x 91 x 50 1/2 in. (144.8 x 231.1 x 128.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "57 in.", "Disp_Width" : "91 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "oak and steel", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "oak and steel", "Info_Page_Comm" : "<SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica';font-style:italic">White-Tipped Blooming</SPAN><SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica'"> <SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica'"> by contemporary artist James Surls (b.1943) hangs in the northern-most end of Dempsey Hall in the Thomas Hall Dining Room on Kenyon’s campus. The steel and oak chandelier-like piece is inspired by tree branches laden with large budding flowers. Surls is an American artist who has derived much of his artistic inspiration from nature and the landscape of East Texas. After graduating from Sam Houston State Teachers College in 1966, Surls earned an M.F.A. from Cranbrook Academy of Art in 1968. Throughout his career, he has developed a handcrafted, rustic aesthetic that has taken form in drawings, prints and sculptures depicting natural and human forms. </SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica';font-style:italic">White-Tipped Blooming</SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica'"> exemplifies many outstanding characteristics of Surls’s oeuvre, which call to mind the artistic traditions on which he builds his practice: the unique oak-and-steel construction consists of expressively carved biomorphic forms that conjure primitivist aesthetics and mythical imagery of early 20th-century avant-garde sculpture, while the humble, organic materials pay homage to American folk art. Surls has exhibited widely across the country, and his work is housed in dozens of prominent institutions such as the Los Angeles County Museum; the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts; the High Museum, Atlanta; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York as well as numerous private and corporate collections. In 2009, nature-influenced large-scale sculptures by Surls were featured on the malls along Park Avenue in NYC through a program managed by the New York City’s Public Art Program. Now based in Colorado, Surls continues to produce and widely exhibit his bronze, steel, wood and mixed media three-dimensional works, in addition to drawings and prints.</SPAN>", "Dedication" : "Gund Gallery Collection; gift of Mr. and Mrs. Graham Gund ’63", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/Surls_WhiteTippedBlooming.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/Surls_WhiteTippedBlooming.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/Surls_WhiteTippedBlooming.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/Surls_WhiteTippedBlooming.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "83", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 61, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/61", "Disp_Access_No" : "2015.2.57", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "2000", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "2000", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2000", "Disp_Title" : "The Kenyon Crowes", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Peter Woytuk", "Sort_Artist" : "Woytuk, Peter", "Disp_Dimen" : "74 1/2 x 57 in. (189.2 x 144.8 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "74 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "57 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "unique cast bronze", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "unique cast bronze", "Info_Page_Comm" : "<SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica'">Many passerby see a gaggle of crows atop the admissions building and assume they are just perched there momentarily; some then realize that these crows are frozen on the rooftop, captured in time by a Kenyon alum. Peter Woytuk graduated Kenyon College in 1980 with a degree in Studio Art, and since has been exhibiting in the United States and in Asia. He is drawn to animal forms and is best known for that work, having been called “the greatest animal sculptor of the Western world in the closing years of the 20th century” </SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica';font-style:italic">(International Herald Tribune)</SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica'">. Lately, Woytuk has been working on a larger scale, but </SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica';font-style:italic">The Kenyon Crowes</SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica'"> sit life-sized and life-like atop Ransom Hall, tricking the eye with a strong sense of motion.</SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Segoe UI'"><BR/><BR/></SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica';font-style:italic">Emma Garschagen `18</SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Segoe UI'"><BR/></SPAN></SPAN>", "Dedication" : "Gund Gallery Collection; gift of Mr. and Mrs. Graham Gund ’63", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/Woytuk_KenyonCrowes.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/Woytuk_KenyonCrowes.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/Woytuk_KenyonCrowes.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/Woytuk_KenyonCrowes.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "84", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 51, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/51", "Disp_Access_No" : "2015.2.47", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1978", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1978", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1978", "Disp_Title" : "Sat Bhai", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Frank Stella", "Sort_Artist" : "Stella, Frank", "Disp_Dimen" : "54 1/8 x 65 3/8 in. (137.5 x 166.1 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "54 1/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "65 3/8 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "mixed media", "Support" : "corrugated aluminum", "Disp_Medium" : "mixed media on corrugated aluminum", "Info_Page_Comm" : "<SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-style:italic">Sat Bhai</SPAN> boldly demands attention, both with its huge size and aggressive dimensionality. The immense, brightly colored baroque curls appear frozen in some sort of leap away from the wall, causing the piece to appear almost like a relief sculpture. Stella describes his own work as “more than two dimensions but short of three…” [1] where the viewer is able to receive unique views by changing their location in relation to the piece, while still having a definite front. Due to this multi-faceted dimensionality, the composition, like the large-scale minimal canvases typical of Stella’s earlier career, creates a truly immersive space. This, however, is achieved in a very unique and atypical way. While most artists working in two dimensions make use of illusionism and perspective to create space, Stella believed that, in the day and age in which he was working, these techniques were no longer effective. Instead, he made use of overwhelming scale and physical space to create this depth. When viewed from straight on, the separate floating shapes, that at first glance appeared jumbled and chaotic, fit together carefully and with obvious calculation. The amorphous curves and swirls meet edge-to-edge and often point-to-point, giving the piece an aspect of unexpected and precarious delicacy. This in turn emphasizes the ephemeral temporality of the urban scenes he strove to capture in this piece and the rest of his Indian Birds series. Overall the piece served as a momentary snapshot of a busy street full of saturated fabrics, bright cosmetics, and glittering jewelry.<BR/><BR/><SPAN STYLE="font-style:italic">Phoebe Pohl `18</SPAN><BR/><BR/><SPAN STYLE="font-style:italic">[1] William Rubin, Frank Stella 1970-1987 (New York: The Museum of Modern Art, 1987).</SPAN>", "Dedication" : "Gund Gallery Collection; gift of Mr. and Mrs. Graham Gund ’63", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/Stella_SatBhai.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/Stella_SatBhai.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/Stella_SatBhai.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/Stella_SatBhai.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "31", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 161, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/161", "Disp_Access_No" : "2017.3.1", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1988", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1988", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1988", "Disp_Title" : "Snowy Owl and Pileated Woodpecker", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Morgan Bulkeley", "Sort_Artist" : "Bulkeley, Morgan", "Disp_Dimen" : "17 x 12 x 8 in. (43.2 x 30.5 x 20.3 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "17 in.", "Disp_Width" : "12 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "oil", "Support" : "carved cherry wood", "Disp_Medium" : "oil on carved cherry wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Gund Gallery Collection; gift of Mr. and Mrs. Graham Gund '63", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2017_03_01-Bulkeley.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2017_03_01-Bulkeley.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2017_03_01-Bulkeley.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2017_03_01-Bulkeley.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "183", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 92, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/92", "Disp_Access_No" : "2017.4.9", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1986", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1986", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1986", "Disp_Title" : "Mirror-Shadow XXVI", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Louise Nevelson", "Sort_Artist" : "Nevelson, Louise", "Disp_Dimen" : "91 x 69 x 22 in. (231.1 x 175.3 x 55.9 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "91 in.", "Disp_Width" : "69 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "painted wood", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "painted wood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "<SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica'">Displayed in Storer Hall,</SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica';font-style:italic"> Mirror-Shadow XXVI </SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helveticais a large-scale wood sculpture covered in black paint. Two thin, tenuous forms extend off the sculpture, as if they are delicately and precariously supporting the entirety of the piece. Upon close inspection, the viewer can notice the rich density of carved shapes and layers that compose this meticulously crafted composition. In the mid-1950s, Nevelson began experimenting with wood landscape sculptures, utilizing bits of furniture and found wood scraps to create the forms. Once assembled, Nevelson would complete the sculpture by painting it black, creating a monochromatic piece. Inspired by Cubist artists, Nevelson abstracted once easily identifiable forms in her work by painting the entire piece black, thereby allowing the viewer to focus on the formal relationships that emerge between the different shapes and dimensions of each object.</SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Segoe UI'"><BR/><BR/></SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Helvetica';font-style:italic">Caroline Chang `18</SPAN><SPAN STYLE="font-family:'Segoe UI'"><BR/></SPAN></SPAN>", "Dedication" : "Gund Gallery Collection; Transfer from Kenyon College; Gift of David Horvitz and Francie Bishop Good", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2017_04_09-Nevelson.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2017_04_09-Nevelson.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2017_04_09-Nevelson.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2017_04_09-Nevelson.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "176", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "image from initial installation in Buchenwald-Wright Gallery ", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }